Aloes

by Jason Miner

Succulent Spotlight: Aloes

Aloe varieties, care tips and more...

Aloe-peglerae-x-ferox-in-bloom

What are the different Aloe varieties and which are best for my needs? How do you care for Aloe succulent plants? These are common questions we hope to answer for you in this post. If you would like to comment, please chime in!

Quick Guide Information:
 Hardiness Zone

9-11

Soil Type

Well draining, gritty, sandy

Sun Exposure

Full sun, Partial sun

Water Needs

Low

Maintenance Level Low
Ideal Climate Dry, Arid 
Potential Dangers Frost Damage and Over-Watering

Aloe hits the spotlight after a long day in the sun, thanks to the soothing properties of Aloe vera. But the Aloe genus offers more than just cool relief. There are hundreds of Aloe species, each with differing leaf size, shape, colors, and texture. Some stay small and are perfect for arrangements or pots. Some grow large (50ft or more) and can accent and brighten any landscape. 

Aloe are native to the sub-Saharan regions of Africa, Madagascar and Arabia where it stays dry and arid most of the year. The thick, gel-filled leaves of the Aloe help it to survive such harsh conditions.

Larger Aloe such as A. striata, A. marlothii, A. ferox will need very little care once established and are terrific for outdoor landscapes. Creeping Aloes such as A. algonica, A. brevifolia and A. perfoliata are great for hillsides and areas you want to cover.

Smaller species perfect for pots and arrangements are A. juvena, A. "White Fox", A. "Pink Blush" and A. descoingsii. 

Aloe Care:

Soil:

  • Most outdoor Aloe require gritty, sandy soil and very little water, especially in the hottest of Summer months and cold Winter months.
  • Potted Aloe do just as well with well-draining succulent soil. 

 

Water:

Pay attention to your plant for watering needs. Different soil types and environments will have different watering schedules. Generally, Aloe will not require a lot of watering and therefore is considered easy-care.

  • A darkening and softening base can indicate too much water.
  • Withering leaves can be a sign of too little water.
  • Check to make sure the soil is completely dried before watering.

 

Sun/Light:

  • Most Aloe will thrive in full to partial sun.
  • Plant your garden with larger Aloe in the back and smaller ones in front. They will bloom multiple times and hummingbirds love them.

 

Dangers:

  • Aloe do not like frosty or freezing and wet environments. Move them to a safe spot during these wet months or cover with freeze protection. 
  • Do not over water!  Error on the side of under-watering

Aloe Varieties

Aloe-brevifolia-blue-pink-succulent-plant-zensability-plants

Aloe brevifolia

Aloe-juvena-green-white-succulent-plant-zensability-aloe-varieties-thumb

Aloe juvena

Aloe-peglerae-zensability-aloe-varieties-thumb

Aloe peglerae

Aloe peglerae x ferox

Aloe White Fox in 4 inch pot. Long, triangular green and white speckled leaves from Zensability Plants.

Aloe "White Fox"

 

Aloe Descoingsii x Aloe Haworthioides succulent plant in 2 inch pot from Zensability

Aloe descoingsii x Aloe haworthioides

Aloe-Green-Gold-succulent-plant-zensability

Aloe "Green Gold"

 


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